wtf horse industry

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My Anaconda don’t want none of that down hill build and mysteriously blurred out hooves. 

My Anaconda don’t want none of that down hill build and mysteriously blurred out hooves. 

(Source: justlittlehorseythings, via lifewithanorwegianfjord)

— 3 weeks ago with 787 notes
Field Study for Equine Melanoma Vaccine Announced →

erato-tia-tuatha:

fivegaited:

mievzar-equus:

Melanomas are among the most common skin tumors in horses. They are particularly common in gray horses because the gene responsible for the gray coat color is also responsible for melanomas. In fact, less than 6% of gray horses over the age of 16 are free from melanomas, which occur most frequently around the tail, anus, eyes, and lips.

Because current treatment strategies are limited and many are not curative, a small handful of researchers in this field have explored the potential for developing vaccines that can treat affected horses. One example is a vaccine directed against “tyrosinase,” a molecule present on melanoma cells.

Jeffrey Phillips, DVM, MS, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, assistant professor of veterinary medicine at Lincoln Memorial University’s College of Veterinary and Comparative Medicine, said one melanoma vaccine (trade name Oncept) has had a good response in their clinical trial. Specifically, the researchers inject 15 horses “with a series of four biweekly injections along with a six-month booster,” Phillips and colleagues wrote in an abstract summarizing their work, supported by the Morris Animal Foundation. In that study Phillips found that the tyrosinase vaccine “appears to be safe and well-tolerated in tumor-bearing horses and appears to result in both clinical activity and a measureable immune response in treated patients.”

More recently, Lawman and colleagues have begun testing a new vaccine (trade name ImmuneFX) that “uses a bacterial gene that primes and educates the immune system to attack tumor cells throughout the body without damaging healthy cells or tissues.”

They have tested the technology in three horses with melanomas so far, and Lawman said the results have been positive: “In one horse, within six months of vaccine initiation the tumor burden was reduced by 40% for lesions that were injected using a needleless injector. The tumor burden was reduced by 48% for the lesions that were not directly injected in the same horse.”

Kris Hennessy, PhD, DVM, of Hennessy Research, in Shawnee Mission, Kansas, will conduct the ImmuneFX field study. Participating horses will receive six doses of the vaccine, and the study is anticipated to last about one year.

A successful study outcome will allow Morphogenesis to seek a commercial license from the USDA to sell the vaccine for treatment of equine melanoma.

!!

Whooooooooooooooo!!

— 3 weeks ago with 16 notes
I feel like stock horses are just getting more downhill ever single year.

I feel like stock horses are just getting more downhill ever single year.

(Source: hit-the-dirt-and-get-back-on)

— 1 month ago with 13 notes

thecityhorse:

These photos were taken at the Spanish Riding School in 2009 among many, many others and brought to the schools attention by the photographer, but otherwise kept private.

After discussions with the school didn’t achieve answers she wanted, she decided to post some of the photos. I have permission to share the photos but I am unsure if the source wants to be named, if they do, I will add more information.

All that said, before the “it’s just one moment/rider/incident” comments start… No. More than one rider. More than one moment. More than one incident.

So, thoughts?

Also… Anyone care to tell me if google translate does a decent enough job on articles / blog posts?

— 1 month ago with 79 notes

shirepower2012:

welcometofigtown:

shirepower2012:

welcometofigtown:

shirepower2012:

barefoothooves:

welcometofigtown:

HEY. You wanna know what is a REALLY bad idea? Doing this ice bucket challenge thing bareback on a completely unsuspecting horse! Here’s a screenshot of what will happen to you and how your horse will react to ice cold water being dumped on them (in case you can’t tell, that is a horse flipping out and about to rear while dumping his helmet-less rider on the ground…. and everyone watching is laughing). This happened at Mesa Vista Therapeutics in Powhatan, Virginia.  They have a Facebook, please feel free to tell them how you feel about their focus on “safety” and animal welfare.

EDIT: oh, and in case you were wondering. YES, this IS the same place that starved and neglected horses and got away with it!

You guys are awesome for spreading this. Please don’t let this die. Let these people know how you feel about their treatment of animals.

No self-respecting, approved therapeutic center would post videos of a helmetless rider, no matter what the circumstances…especially since is obviously not one of those PATH-approved exceptions to the helmet rule.

I, for one, am appalled that a fundraising awareness campaign has turned into this.

Heh, funny story about that. This place advertises as being PATH certified and they aren’t. In fact, they haven’t been for years. And even if they tried, their complete disregard for PATH’s safety regulations would make it a VERY hard transition.

Had to figure they weren’t. Have they been reported to PATH for that sort of false advertising?? I don’t even know how one would go about doing that, but they are dealing with people with all sort of disabilities…their clients deserve the truth. Irresponsible people have no business working with such clients, especially not when large animals are also involved.
As a PATH Certified Instructor I’m appalled by that sort of behavior. In addition to the photos I saw of abused animals makes me absolutely disgusted.

I’ve tried reporting them with no response from PATH. Part of the problem is they have a very specific process for reporting problems with their facilities and… this place isn’t one. The whole place is just SO fucked up. And yet they seem to get away with it every time they do something terrible :(

Geeze… I’ll have to do some digging and see if I can find some proof/information for PATH… There must be something, somewhere, where someplace falsely advertising as PATH certified can be reported. Unfortunately, they probably won’t be able to do anything because, as you said, these guys aren’t PATH, but maybe without the false advertising people will stop going there.
I feel just awful for the animals there, and the clients that need better services.

— 2 months ago with 177 notes
Anonymous asked: Can you tell me if the stallions are Herda carriers- pos/pos or herda/negative


Answer:

I can try..

— 2 months ago
pensiveoffensive:

theclassicalhorse:

thecityhorse:

A horse posted through an auction network (he’s safe!!!)
 Can we all just stop and appreciate that face????

Now THAT is a roman nose

Um please tell me someone arrested whoever had been starving that horse…

You haven’t seen many auction horses have you? He’s actually in pretty decent weight comparatively.

pensiveoffensive:

theclassicalhorse:

thecityhorse:

A horse posted through an auction network (he’s safe!!!)


Can we all just stop and appreciate that face????

Now THAT is a roman nose

Um please tell me someone arrested whoever had been starving that horse…

You haven’t seen many auction horses have you? He’s actually in pretty decent weight comparatively.

— 2 months ago with 248 notes
kimblewick:

scarlettjane22:

Falabella Stallion Ciuciu
Karolina Gmochowska Photography

ONWARDS


I know little about Falabellas but surely this little dude is a poor representation, right?

kimblewick:

scarlettjane22:

Falabella Stallion Ciuciu

Karolina Gmochowska Photography

ONWARDS

I know little about Falabellas but surely this little dude is a poor representation, right?

(via theprincessandthepercheron)

— 3 months ago with 2768 notes