wtf horse industry

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shirepower2012:

welcometofigtown:

shirepower2012:

welcometofigtown:

shirepower2012:

barefoothooves:

welcometofigtown:

HEY. You wanna know what is a REALLY bad idea? Doing this ice bucket challenge thing bareback on a completely unsuspecting horse! Here’s a screenshot of what will happen to you and how your horse will react to ice cold water being dumped on them (in case you can’t tell, that is a horse flipping out and about to rear while dumping his helmet-less rider on the ground…. and everyone watching is laughing). This happened at Mesa Vista Therapeutics in Powhatan, Virginia.  They have a Facebook, please feel free to tell them how you feel about their focus on “safety” and animal welfare.

EDIT: oh, and in case you were wondering. YES, this IS the same place that starved and neglected horses and got away with it!

You guys are awesome for spreading this. Please don’t let this die. Let these people know how you feel about their treatment of animals.

No self-respecting, approved therapeutic center would post videos of a helmetless rider, no matter what the circumstances…especially since is obviously not one of those PATH-approved exceptions to the helmet rule.

I, for one, am appalled that a fundraising awareness campaign has turned into this.

Heh, funny story about that. This place advertises as being PATH certified and they aren’t. In fact, they haven’t been for years. And even if they tried, their complete disregard for PATH’s safety regulations would make it a VERY hard transition.

Had to figure they weren’t. Have they been reported to PATH for that sort of false advertising?? I don’t even know how one would go about doing that, but they are dealing with people with all sort of disabilities…their clients deserve the truth. Irresponsible people have no business working with such clients, especially not when large animals are also involved.
As a PATH Certified Instructor I’m appalled by that sort of behavior. In addition to the photos I saw of abused animals makes me absolutely disgusted.

I’ve tried reporting them with no response from PATH. Part of the problem is they have a very specific process for reporting problems with their facilities and… this place isn’t one. The whole place is just SO fucked up. And yet they seem to get away with it every time they do something terrible :(

Geeze… I’ll have to do some digging and see if I can find some proof/information for PATH… There must be something, somewhere, where someplace falsely advertising as PATH certified can be reported. Unfortunately, they probably won’t be able to do anything because, as you said, these guys aren’t PATH, but maybe without the false advertising people will stop going there.
I feel just awful for the animals there, and the clients that need better services.

— 1 week ago with 176 notes
Anonymous asked: Can you tell me if the stallions are Herda carriers- pos/pos or herda/negative


Answer:

I can try..

— 3 weeks ago
pensiveoffensive:

theclassicalhorse:

thecityhorse:

A horse posted through an auction network (he’s safe!!!)
 Can we all just stop and appreciate that face????

Now THAT is a roman nose

Um please tell me someone arrested whoever had been starving that horse…

You haven’t seen many auction horses have you? He’s actually in pretty decent weight comparatively.

pensiveoffensive:

theclassicalhorse:

thecityhorse:

A horse posted through an auction network (he’s safe!!!)


Can we all just stop and appreciate that face????

Now THAT is a roman nose

Um please tell me someone arrested whoever had been starving that horse…

You haven’t seen many auction horses have you? He’s actually in pretty decent weight comparatively.

— 4 weeks ago with 241 notes
kimblewick:

scarlettjane22:

Falabella Stallion Ciuciu
Karolina Gmochowska Photography

ONWARDS


I know little about Falabellas but surely this little dude is a poor representation, right?

kimblewick:

scarlettjane22:

Falabella Stallion Ciuciu

Karolina Gmochowska Photography

ONWARDS

I know little about Falabellas but surely this little dude is a poor representation, right?

(via theprincessandthepercheron)

— 1 month ago with 2499 notes

thecityhorse:

Navicular Disease via theHorse on Facebook!

— 1 month ago with 262 notes
otp221b:

thecityhorse:

that-horsegirl:

englishtaught-westerncaught:

thecityhorse:

I haven’t been thing angry over an auction posting in a long time. Please share & signal boost this poor old guy with the hope that someone can give him peace in his final days, or have him humanely euthanized and save him the terrible death that awaits via slaughter. 35 years of loyal hard work, a personality solid enough to have been a loyal summer camp horse who is surely remembered fondly by countless kids… And dumped in a slaughter pen because at 35 his age finally caught up on a mountain trail ride.
 I hate people, I hate then more and more every day.
Listing as posted by the auction:
If this had been a “S” month, Nicholas would be named “Saintly”. This old boy is said to be a Quarab and we were told that he is 35 years old. He has spent his life being a good boy and was used as a kids camp horse and in the trails. He could not keep up on his last mountain ride and so his owner brought him to the kill pen today. He is 15.2hh, in good weight and pretty sound. He gets along well with others and does everything asked of him. His feet look good and he picks them up easily. Nicholas is a good old boy that is friendly and anyone can ride.
Deadline: 7/22/14  Location: Sunnyside, WA
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10100143814243086&id=118500253
 Please reblog.

Someone bail him!!

If someone has the room for him, I’m sure I can get some money together to help out. I know many other riders who would help support this too. 

Like always, there is room in my pasture & program for a horse who can work in therapy.
But WA is a far way away, surely I can’t be the only one with room?

Contact these people in Spokane, WA. They have a wonderful service for disabled children and are sometimes in need of gentle, reliable horses. They’re also good people. If you make the situation known to them, they may be able to help, or know someone else who can.
http://freereinspokane.com

otp221b:

thecityhorse:

that-horsegirl:

englishtaught-westerncaught:

thecityhorse:

I haven’t been thing angry over an auction posting in a long time. Please share & signal boost this poor old guy with the hope that someone can give him peace in his final days, or have him humanely euthanized and save him the terrible death that awaits via slaughter. 35 years of loyal hard work, a personality solid enough to have been a loyal summer camp horse who is surely remembered fondly by countless kids… And dumped in a slaughter pen because at 35 his age finally caught up on a mountain trail ride.


I hate people, I hate then more and more every day.

Listing as posted by the auction:

If this had been a “S” month, Nicholas would be named “Saintly”. This old boy is said to be a Quarab and we were told that he is 35 years old. He has spent his life being a good boy and was used as a kids camp horse and in the trails. He could not keep up on his last mountain ride and so his owner brought him to the kill pen today. He is 15.2hh, in good weight and pretty sound. He gets along well with others and does everything asked of him. His feet look good and he picks them up easily. Nicholas is a good old boy that is friendly and anyone can ride.

Deadline: 7/22/14 
Location: Sunnyside, WA

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10100143814243086&id=118500253


Please reblog.

Someone bail him!!

If someone has the room for him, I’m sure I can get some money together to help out. I know many other riders who would help support this too. 

Like always, there is room in my pasture & program for a horse who can work in therapy.

But WA is a far way away, surely I can’t be the only one with room?

Contact these people in Spokane, WA. They have a wonderful service for disabled children and are sometimes in need of gentle, reliable horses. They’re also good people. If you make the situation known to them, they may be able to help, or know someone else who can.

http://freereinspokane.com

— 1 month ago with 1797 notes
miniature-madness:

NEW TEST FOR DWARFISM AVAILABLE
A new genetic test for a form of dwarfism in miniature horses is now available from the University of Kentucky’s Animal Genetic Testing and Research Laboratory.
The test identifies carriers of four mutations in the aggrecan gene, which contains proteins critical to the development of cartilage structures. The mutations may result in a range of physical issues, including respiratory problems, oral malformations and abnormal bone growth. 
Researchers say carriers of the mutated gene may not exhibit any outwards signs, but when two carriers are mated, the result can be a foal affected with any combination of the genes, some of which are lethal.
The new test does not identify all forms of dwarfism in Miniature Horses or forms found in other breeds. For more information about the test, visit the laboratory’s website or call 859-218-1193.
Article from Equus magazine
If people refuse to stop breeding horses with the gene there is no excuse not to have your breeding stock tested so dwarf foals won’t be produced. Horses with the gene should never be bred, but realistically there are people who don’t care, and at least this test might make people more aware of what’s in their stock so crossing of two carriers can be avoided. 

miniature-madness:

NEW TEST FOR DWARFISM AVAILABLE

A new genetic test for a form of dwarfism in miniature horses is now available from the University of Kentucky’s Animal Genetic Testing and Research Laboratory.

The test identifies carriers of four mutations in the aggrecan gene, which contains proteins critical to the development of cartilage structures. The mutations may result in a range of physical issues, including respiratory problems, oral malformations and abnormal bone growth. 

Researchers say carriers of the mutated gene may not exhibit any outwards signs, but when two carriers are mated, the result can be a foal affected with any combination of the genes, some of which are lethal.

The new test does not identify all forms of dwarfism in Miniature Horses or forms found in other breeds. For more information about the test, visit the laboratory’s website or call 859-218-1193.

Article from Equus magazine

If people refuse to stop breeding horses with the gene there is no excuse not to have your breeding stock tested so dwarf foals won’t be produced. Horses with the gene should never be bred, but realistically there are people who don’t care, and at least this test might make people more aware of what’s in their stock so crossing of two carriers can be avoided. 

— 1 month ago with 57 notes

theclassicalhorse:

Horse Slaughter: Hitting close to home

My Barn Manager posted this on Facebook and I think that this is an important story to share, as I know that many people have had similar experiences:

Some of you may remember Spice ( Garland Minuet), one of my grandmothers fillies by Nick (Burkland Nicholas). I sold her two years ago and nothing prepared me for the shock of where she ended up, 2 Years later: 
at an Amish specialty driving sale, thin, dirty, depressed ,unwanted and being bid on by kill buyers……Cindy Noll , who is associated with Morgan Safenet, won the bid and saved her. Thanks to the power of social media, I was finally contacted by Ellen Ellen Alden who made the connection from Judy Nason, To my grandmother, and to me… and now, finally, I am happy to announce, Spice is going to be coming home, where she belongs, and where she will never have to go through the hell she went through just this past year.

*****will be looking for help to get her transported home from North Carolina****


From Morgan Safenet:
THE POWER OF THE NETWORK BRINGS THIS GIRL HOME!!

Many of you have been following a grade mare saved back in the winter. No papers. Selling through an Amish specialty auction, thin and unkept compared to the jazzed up harness horses selling that day. Cindy Noll was on hand for us and bid on this little Morgan mare. She was said to ride and drive and be a great family horse, but there she stood, unwanted being bid on by other brokers. That day her world changed…for the better. 

We watched her transform in quarantine to a bright and lively healthy Morgan mare. Very pretty…she just had to be someone…but who…would DNA prove anything. Well that it did! And the day I was leaving for Circle J in CO we found her to be Garland Minuet. A hunter pleasure winner by Burkland Nicolas….a horse very dear to me and connected to people who are very dear to me. Usually we do all the call backs…find more out from former owners breeders but there was no time for that on the road. Posting all the info to FB and tagging friends ( Brenda Hoops Rouse)who may know someone connected with this beautiful girl, well that brought her to Chelsea Miller!!

Cindi, who’s barn name is actually Spice, was the first filly born out of Marjorie Millers breeding program. Chelsea has known Spice her whole life. She was in training at winged Spur farm when she won the hunter class. Chelsea’s grandmother ( Marjorie miller) had passed away and she inherited the farm and all the horses. At the time she was not in a position to support so many so some, including Spice, were sold to what were thought to be great homes on the conditions they’d come back if no longer able to do the job or wanted. Chelsea was devastated to know of Spice’s story and to think she was so close to being lost in the system.

We know not every breeder or former owner is in the position to take back a horse that has come at risk. There is never any pressure to do so. But when one can and wants to so willingly, it is always such a special gift to send them home. It is the story of Black Beauty! Lost identity…finding home!!

So, without further ado we are beyond thrilled to CONGRATULATE CHELSEA MILLER ON THE ADOPTION OF GARLAND MINUET…AKA SPICE…AKAA CINDI!! You are going home girlfriend!! Back to your roots!!

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HELPED MAKE THIS HAPPEN AND HELPED GET THIS GIRL SAFE!! Special thanks to Cindy Kingsboro (our bidder and quarantine provider), Karen Schnell and Liz Bramble (foster and trainer of 30 days saddle refresher).

Sincerely,
Colleen, Lisa, and Vicki
Founders Morgan Safenet

— 1 month ago with 29 notes
theclassicalhorse:

classicalequestrian:

wtfhorsepics:

Explain those feet.

and wtf is up with the horse sticking his neck out like that

The feet

theclassicalhorse:

classicalequestrian:

wtfhorsepics:

Explain those feet.

and wtf is up with the horse sticking his neck out like that

The feet

— 1 month ago with 20 notes

theclassicalhorse:

image

This is a great observation and hopefully my answer will be clear enough to understand.  

Way back when warfare was man-to-man combat, High School Dressage training was the key to unlocking the potential in a horse for war.  The close combat required horses to be highly collected, and carry most of the weight on the hind legs in order to stay in place, while still being able to maneuver around obstacles.  It really didn’t matter how “beautiful” the horses flat gaits were and it certainly was not a concern when the horses hind end and neck were extremely well muscled, but the mid back looked dropped.

image

The goal was a light, responsive and obedient horse that would help the rider in battle to win, and the most important factor was that the horse was 100% capable of collection.  People were breeding horses for collection and these were those baroque type horses.  Antoine de Pluvinel was the man that really spread this idea that horses could have more willingness and lightness to do its job for humans.

Until the French Revolution started, the horses were muscular, round, and able to collect very easily.

With the French Revolution and cannons and gun warfare brought an end to the collected horse and the art of the war horse.  This was because it took up to 12 years to school a horse in the highest level for war, but it took one second to shoot that horse down with a gun.  There was no more motivation to take all this time to school horses when they would surely be killed.

Instead of schooling 100 horses to the haute ecole, Napoleon wanted thousands of fast horses of the Arabian and thoroughbred blood who pushed with their hind legs.  If 100 of the horses were shot down, there would be 900 more to win the battle.

image

Back to your question:

It really depends on the trainer and the method.  Some trainers follow the old Renaissance style (now called Academic Art of Riding) and in this style, there is not much emphasis placed on how “hollow” the horses back appears.  How do you get a horses back to not be hollow? you push them forward.  This is not the goal of the Academic Art of Riding.  The goal was to make the hind legs carry more weight.

It also depends on the horse.  Trainers like Bend Branderup and Marijke de Jong have had baroque horses who have an easier time carrying weight, and warmblood and hot breeds who tend to push forward more with the hind legs.  For a trainer who emphasizes lightness and self carriage, depending on the willingness of the horse, the trainer might not want to push the horse forward in an attempt to raise the back.

Here we can see Bend Branderup with his horse preforming a rather hollow piaffe:

image

and here we see him with a different horse preforming a very engaged passage:image

In academic art of riding, collection and lightness are more important then avoiding this “hollowness”.

Some trainers follow a different path of “classical”.  Here you can see that to Anja Beran, lightless comes first.

image

(take note that I’m not passing this up as a correct passage.  Im just explaining that in the French school, lightness comes before accuracy)

Conclusion: There are many different pathways of Classical riding.  Each has its own set of goals and ideals.  For all of the reputable “classical” trainers, I  have come across good photos, and some not so ideal photos.  The best part about the classical art of riding, is that the horses and riders are always improving.  The art is a self motivated one.  You don’t see these trainers competing.  In sport dressage, when you reach the highest level and still preform crappy, hollow movements and you get high 90s for test scores and the fans go wild, is there still room for improvement?

— 1 month ago with 25 notes